A 22″ Haro trails machine? Maybe…

Things started off innocently enough.

Last week  SugarCayne posted a look at the new 2019 Haro Group 1 RS-1, 20″ Trails Edition.

The idea behind it was to make an updated version of the Group 1 (featuring modern geometry) with the classic colorway of the 80s.

(For context Haro has done a good job of re-imagining the classics from the modern age…with retro cruisers being some of their popular offerings.)

No doubt, there’s some great stuff on this bike: the frame and fork is full cro-mo, the bars are 9″, the classic Haro sprocket design makes an appearance and the 1978 parts round out the components.

However, it was an instant bummer to see that Haro had decided to go with a 21″ top tube for this bike (Cayne noted his reservation with this too).

As soon as I saw this, I instantly thought, “Why not just make it a 22″ (wheels & top tube)?

After all, the people buying this are most likely older/bigger…and well, 22″ tend to also really shine at the trails.

Seemed like a no-brainer.

Apparently David Anderson over at 22-Inch BMX thought the same thing.

According to David,

 “I thought, that needs to be a RS22.”

Then he mocked up an image for the 22-inch BMX group Facebook page  “to show the minor changes that would need to be made to make it happen.”

He suggested the following geometry:

  • Head Angle: 74.5 degrees
  • Seat Tube Angle: 71.5 degrees
  • Top Tube: 21.85″
  • Chain Stay: 14″
  • Seat Tube height: 10.25″
  • Bottom Bracket 12-12.5″ (on 22″ wheels)

Seemed pretty legit to me.

The 22-Inch BMX group seemed to be very receptive to the ideas as well. Many wondered aloud (or at least commented) what would it take for Haro to do this?

Well, that’s when things escalated.

Haro’s John Buultjens saw the discussion and weighed in.

According to Buultjens, if 100 people express interest in buying  a 22″ Group 1, Haro will make them!

Wasting little time, Anderson put together a poll on the 22-Inch BMX Facebook Group page to gauge interest.

They’re not quite at the 100 person mark yet but it’s only been a couple of days.

If this is something that might interest you, check out the poll and add your 2 cents.

Trevor Sigloch’s 22″ edit rolls out

S&M rider Trevor Sigloch recently debuted his signature 20″ frame (the DTF) with features befitting his tall stature…most notably a 5″ headtube and a 9.25″ standover.

You can check that out in his “What I ride” clip that came out in early December.

Now that it’s 2019, Trevor has stepped things up a bit by dropping a brand new edit called, “I need my Dubs”.

The cool thing about this particular piece of footage is that Trevor is hitting the streets, parks and the dirt aboard a 22″ S&M ATF.

His 22″ setup is pretty sweet too…in addition to the aforementioned ATF frame….it’s got some Hoder Bars, 22″ Revenge wheels, Speedball tires and (to keep things moto) a stylish crossbar pad.

Pretty stoked on this…let’s keep those 22″ edits coming!

Framed Bikes’ new 22″ Defendant priced to fly

Framed Bikes, out of Minnesota, is focused on making fun bikes that aren’t expensive.

This past weekend, they dropped the news on social media that they were going to be adding a 22″ BMX bike called the “Defendant” to their lineup.

The Defendant is available in two trim levels, an entry level high-ten (frame/fork) version and a Pro version with a full cro-mo frame and fork.

The crazy thing is that even though it is dubbed the “Pro” version –and is full cro-mo with sealed components (minus the looseball headset)..it currently retails for the decidely non-pro price of just under $320 US.

Wow.

That is very a good price for a full cro-mo complete.

Now the full geo hasn’t been posted yet (most notably the head angle and seat angle) but what has been posted is looking pretty promising:

  • Top Tube: 22″
  • Seat Tube: 10.5″
  • Chain Stay: 14.5″
  • Bottom Bracket Height: 12.5″

Not too shabby.

In the clip below, Brandon (from Framed Bikes) does a walk through of the 22″ Defendant, showcasing some of the key features and explaining some of the thinking behind the bike.

Keep in mind, Framed Bikes is a direct-to-consumer outfit so you won’t be able to hit up your regular bike shop or mail order for one of these. They are only available via framedbikes.com or the-house.com.

 

At this price-point, I think we’re going to see even more people taking the plunge and experimenting with 22″ bikes…and that’s a good thing in my books.

 

Another 22″ convert

Chris Rantell is another convert to the 22″ movement.

Chris is a BMXer from way back and has done his time with 20″, 24″ and 26″ bikes.

Sunday even featured him on their site doing a Wallride on a Sunday Model C during the 420 Jam a few years back.

Despite being able to shred on all those sizes of bikes…apparently something was still missing.

According to Chris:

  26 was more cruiser based but the 24 was meant to be a bmx bike and it just never felt like it to me. 

The 22 on the other hand?

  First time I got on it it 180’d perfect. 24 hop stuff is hard. Top tubes on most [22s] are also around 22 which gives more foot clearance. Honestly it really truly felt like just a scaled-up bmx and I just felt like my back is straighter. 

Chris documented some of his first session of really riding his 22″ at Joyride 150 bike park (see below) a few days ago.

As the clips show it looks like the 22″ hits the right spot for his height and riding style.

Hope to see more 22″ clips from this guy.