This is the new stuff

Oh man, it’s that time of year….

Bike companies are rolling out that new stuff. Shedding the skin* of the previous year’s lineup and getting hyped for the new model year.

Stolen’s updated their popular Spade complete with an appropriately trail-sy colorway.

Subrosa’s upsized their 22″ Malum complete bike from 21.5 top tube to one that is 22″. The raw with a hint of orange anno is super nice too.

 

DK’s back with the iconic 22″ General Lee in two colorways: the iconic orange Duke Boys orange and the Maximum Steel colorway,which sounds a bit like an 80s metal band, but is actually has nice blue/grey finish. The Maximum Steel is a limited run situation so don’t sleep on it if strikes your fancy.

 

Speaking of limited runs, FBM is also doing a run of their beauty 22″ Steadfast frames.…this time in two sizes: 22 3/4″ and 22″ top tube lengths. You can get these in one of three colorways: Sunburst, Tundra Green, Trans Brown.

 

Finally, Big Dave over at PDC collaborated with rider Matt Stahl to develop the 22″ Operator frame. Featuring a steeper head tube and more responsive geometry (than most trailsy 22″ frames). Matt, along with a bunch of other volunteer testers, are currently riding the prototypes and making final recommendations before it goes on the market. It looks real good though.

More on that in a followup post.

 

 

*I guess I got an a bit of a Peter Gabriel “Sledgehammer” kick there…

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Something new, something old

Answer BMX dropped the news recently on social media that they have a OS20 tire in the works.

A welcome development as the only tire game in town these days, OS20-wise, is Tioga.  OS20 tires have been notoriously hard to find in the past little while so another brand option will definitely help a lot of people out.

However, those OS20 outages might be shortlived as Tioga also recently announced that they were ramping up production of the OS20 tires to meet the “huge demand in the past few months.”

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Tioga OS20 PowerBlock S-Spec – We have had a huge demand in the past few months, but don’t fret OS20 fans, we are making these right now around the clock and will have tires back in stock soon! Race proven by the fastest racers from your local tracks to the top Elites, the PowerBlock is faithfully recreated in OS20 diameter. Every detail, from precise dimension of the center blocks to the optimal proportions of its shoulder tread, is scrutinized to ensure the OS20 PowerBlock fully takes advantage of its larger size. 20" IS FAST – OS20 is FAST2! What is OS20 PowerBlock? OS20 is NOT 22". OS20 is 20", but bigger. There are two wheel sizes under the 20" category – the 20" on Jr/mini bikes uses the 451mm diameter wheel in narrow widths (for 20-1/8" & 20-3/8" tires), and the conventional 20" which uses the smaller 406mm diameter wheel but in wider widths. OS20 is 451mm wheel diameter in widths similar to 406mm wheels. OS20 tires are not compatible with Jr/Mini sized rims; OS20 rims are not compatible with Jr/Mini sized tires.

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It’s interesting to see how, when a new competitor appears, Tioga starts to suddenly address the building demand for OS20 tires.

Maybe now, Tioga will keep the OS20 at reasonable stock levels –and we don’t have to go through droughts of availability — if only because they want to maintain their market share.

Yess BMX’s new OS20 experiment

Yess BMX is not shy about experimenting with new things (see their belt drive cruiser or their Project 2024) and it looks like they have cooked up something new again.

Introducing the 20os20 concept build.

The idea is to combine the smoothness of the OS20 steering with the gearing/tire/rollout selection of a regular 20″ race bike.

However, the concept isn’t entirely new.

Similar concepts have been tried in both motocross and downhill MTB.

Closer to the OS20/22″ side of things, United rider Kyle Forte experimented with running a 22″ front end on his 20″ (before making the switch to a full 22″ ride that ended up being his signature model, the KF22)

According to Forte in canyoudigitbmx.com:

This is when I decided to try a 22” front wheel & longer fork on the front of my UTD 20”. My thinking was that it would raise the front end & slack the head angle out & make the bike less twitchy & more relaxed. I tried it & looked a bit odd, but I could feel the difference. The main downside was that it made my bike super easy to loop out. From the success of the experiment, I really wanted to run a 22” on the rear & dial a frame in to suit me.

Will the big wheel in front/small wheel in back combo work in racing better than did for Forte at the trails?

Time will tell.

A modest proposal for Odyssey

If you spend any time at all on the 22″ threads on the various forums and pages, the topic of Sunday/Odyssey joining the 22″ movement will come up.

More specifically, why Sunday/Odyssey hasn’t joined the movement.

Some have claimed that Sunday/Odyssey (let’s just say Odyssey for this post) hasn’t dived into the pool –even though a large number of their competitors have — is because they overinvested in the 24″ BMX scene and were left hanging when their investment wasn’t met with the demand they were expecting. Because of this, they are more than a little gun-shy about getting their feet wet with 22″ BMX. (I’m not saying this is true…it’s just what people are saying)

Another piece of evidence for this line of thinking were some comments from G-Sport in the Bike Guide forum discussing 22″ BMX. He more or less said there was no business case for it.

Granted, these comments were from a 2011 thread when the 22″ scene was far less populated by companies having a go at this new wheel size.

To be fair, there was a similar view expressed in 2010 over on our brother site, Cruiser Revolution, in a 22″ themed post. At the time, only one company Faction was doing anything 22″ related in a meaningful way.  The post suggested that without more industry support it would likely be an extremely small niche without much traction.

Of course, once S&M tiptoed into the scene, before full-on embracing it, other companies now had the “air cover” to try it for themselves. (Which kind of proved the thesis of the post.)

Digression: Felt actually introduced a 22″ complete (pic here)after dropping their new school 24 from their lineup back in 2013.  Kind of ahead of their time you might say, but alas Felt BMX is no more. I guess with that kind of forward thinking, you’re just flying too close to the sun…

Odyssey tends to be higher end, with more proprietary items —Hazard Lite, etc. –so it’s a bit harder to do a cookie cutter entry into the 22″ scene. They have standards (which is also why they are so popular/respected).

So what’s a company to do? On the one hand you have customers begging you to produce something…but you’re worried about misjudging demand and being left holding the bag/overstocked.

I think, my modest proposal is to embrace a tried and true BMX industry practice….copy what works for someone else.

Chris Moeller, of S&M Bikes saw the gap in availability/reliability of replacement 29″ forks for the “raise ’em up” wheelie crowd. Moeller pounced on the opportunity and “Pounding Beer” forks were born. (And, if I’m not mistaken, they sold out immediately).

S&M isn’t a “bike life” company –they don’t even make 29″ frames–but they found a way to make money in an area adjacent to their core business.

Odyssey could do the same.

Odyssey makes some of the best aftermarket forks in the industry.

The 22″ scene is sick with completes with easy to bend forks….see the similar business gap Odyssey?

With a slight tweak the R32 forks could become the R22 fork.

And, if they’re light enough (which the 20″ version are, I think)…you’ve got the small but still significant OS20 crowd who might grab ’em up too.

With just a little effort, they could become the 22″ aftermarket fork.

Heck, S&M already did a second run of the Pounding Beer forks because the first run went so fast.

Seems like a win-win to me.

And, that’s my modest proposal.

 

(Also, don’t forget to send a pair of the first batch this way…I can’t be doing all the market strategy here without a little something, something, dontcha know)

Dan Atherton’s 22″ titanium bike

Dan Atherton of “The Athertons” fame (and a long distinguished MTB career…along with his talented siblings) has debuted a new 22″ titanium BMX bike.

This comes as a surprise given that what was expected from this Atherton Bikes company was mountain bikes, and possibly some enduro and e-bikes (heaven forbid).

According to Dan, he’s “been working with @tedjamesdesign for over a year on this beauty, anyone that knows Ted James knows how passionate he is about bikes and that passion comes out in the way he builds frames”.

Granted, it’s still only a prototype…but wow, is it hawt!

All titanium with a disc brake!

Yowza!

Dan seems pretty stoked on it if you can go by this picture.

Over on PinkBike, who were ones to break the story (after Instagram, of course), Atherton jumped into the comments with this explanation/teaser:

Cheers for the comments guys, this bike is very much a prototype at the moment with no plans to sell it as yet, i basically had this bike built because i like riding big jumps on my BMX, and coming from Wales where the jumps are not super smooth it made sense to run 22″ wheels, i also wanted a disk because anyone who has ridden Big, Fast, Downhill jumps knows that having a reliable brake gives a lot of confidence!! Myself, Ted James and Atherton Bikes have been blown away by the positive response to this bike and if it becomes clear there is a market for this type of bike then maybe we could make something happen!!

“Maybe we could make something happen?”

Sounds pretty promising.

For now, I just want to see some riding clips of Atherton ripping on this thing…I need some shred!

22″ race tires back on the table?

Chris Moeller (of S&M bikes) floated the idea of a 22″ X 1.95 race tire some time ago (back in 2016, I think) but for whatever reason they never seemed to make it to market.

Many people have made do with the slimmer of the current offerings (if they wanted to race their 22s)…but I suspect many silently grumbled about the weight penalty of the more street/trail-designed rubber when they used them at the track.

You might also remember that ORP BMX tried to engineer their own solution by mounting OS20 tires to 22″ wheels.

Not a bad interim fix, but ORP themselves admitted they were a bear to mount. It also goes without saying that whenever it came time to swap out the tire (or tube) if a flat or blowout occurred….well, that’s probably not going to be the most pleasant experience either.

Anyway, back to the present day….

Moeller recently asked on his Instagram if S&M should make smaller size racing tires…and that he was considering opening up a new mold to do so (presumably if interest was there).

Well, that prompted this exchange between John Paul Rogers (S&M alum/BMX enthusiast) and Moeller:

jpr_fla Produce light weight 22” tires & wheel sets that aren’t monster truck size, my back hurts. Harry Leary came up with Turbo Lite tires & wheels in the 80s. There has to be at least 40-50 people worldwide that want this.

moeller_chris @jpr_fla basically a 22” race tire in our 1.95 size. It’s actually a good idea.

 

Of course, after a number of comments followed from a number of 22″ aficionados (myself included) asking for 22 X 1.95 option.

Will this be enough to convince Moeller to open a mold for a 22″ X 1.95 Trackmark tire?

I can’t be sure at this point but I’m hopeful.

Heck, S&M’s offering 26″ and 29″ tires these days…so I think there’s got a be some love for the 22″ crowd for a more race-friendly tire option.

(And..I have my fingers crossed that they get them out by summer so I can throw them on my own rig for racing.)

A 22″ Haro trails machine? Maybe…

Things started off innocently enough.

Last week  SugarCayne posted a look at the new 2019 Haro Group 1 RS-1, 20″ Trails Edition.

The idea behind it was to make an updated version of the Group 1 (featuring modern geometry) with the classic colorway of the 80s.

(For context Haro has done a good job of re-imagining the classics from the modern age…with retro cruisers being some of their popular offerings.)

No doubt, there’s some great stuff on this bike: the frame and fork is full cro-mo, the bars are 9″, the classic Haro sprocket design makes an appearance and the 1978 parts round out the components.

However, it was an instant bummer to see that Haro had decided to go with a 21″ top tube for this bike (Cayne noted his reservation with this too).

As soon as I saw this, I instantly thought, “Why not just make it a 22″ (wheels & top tube)?

After all, the people buying this are most likely older/bigger…and well, 22″ tend to also really shine at the trails.

Seemed like a no-brainer.

Apparently David Anderson over at 22-Inch BMX thought the same thing.

According to David,

 “I thought, that needs to be a RS22.”

Then he mocked up an image for the 22-inch BMX group Facebook page  “to show the minor changes that would need to be made to make it happen.”

He suggested the following geometry:

  • Head Angle: 74.5 degrees
  • Seat Tube Angle: 71.5 degrees
  • Top Tube: 21.85″
  • Chain Stay: 14″
  • Seat Tube height: 10.25″
  • Bottom Bracket 12-12.5″ (on 22″ wheels)

Seemed pretty legit to me.

The 22-Inch BMX group seemed to be very receptive to the ideas as well. Many wondered aloud (or at least commented) what would it take for Haro to do this?

Well, that’s when things escalated.

Haro’s John Buultjens saw the discussion and weighed in.

According to Buultjens, if 100 people express interest in buying  a 22″ Group 1, Haro will make them!

Wasting little time, Anderson put together a poll on the 22-Inch BMX Facebook Group page to gauge interest.

They’re not quite at the 100 person mark yet but it’s only been a couple of days.

If this is something that might interest you, check out the poll and add your 2 cents.